General Information

The Environmental Health Office is responsible for the design, review and final inspection of residential septic system and final inspection of commercial on-site sewage disposal systems. Also, this office receives and follows complaints investigations (Nuisance) in health issues like failing septic systems, vector control, illegal dumping, death animals and illegal drug laboratory ocurrence (Meth lab), etc. In addition, the office is highly and actively involved in other environmental protection services such constructed wetlands as a green alternative to treat sewage on-site. Please, feel free to contact the Health Department for any additional information.

On-Site Sewage Rule

Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) and LaGrange County Health Department (LCHD) Septic System Regulations
The onsite sewage treatment guides the wastewater disposal to ensure that septic system installation is completed in compliance with minimum standards established by the Indiana State Residential Rule 410 IAC 6-8.3, Commercial Rule 410 IAC 6-10.1, and the LaGrange County Ordinance (1985). The goal of the program is to assure that onsite sewage disposal systems are designed and installed according to minimum requirements to protect public health by preventing wastewater from contaminating surface or underground (drinking groundwater) and preventing disease transmission via septic tanks effluent without any treatment.

Several types of systems are used throughout the county including the gravity septic tank and trenches system; also know as a conventional septic system using stone and 4” PVC pipe or a gravelless system using plastic chambers. Also, tire chips and Presby pipe are now other options to consider for soil absorption trenches. The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) authorized their use on a one-for-one basis. Tire chips are used as a substitute for stone in absorption field trenches. Also, septic system using pump assisted (Flood-Dosed) and pressurized systems such as the at-grade system or the elevated sand mound systems when site limitations prohibit the use of a conventional system. The LaGrange County Health department has been working during the last 20 years promoting environmental and ecological sound sewage treatment system like the constructed wetlands with the last generation including a vertical flow recirculating system as an exceptional green alternative to the conventional septic system. Others sewage treatment installed in LaGrange County include the AlgaeWheel, the Nibler Jr system and drip irrigation.

Homeowner Septic System Installation

A homeowner is allowed to install the onsite wastewater disposal system for his/her residential. However, homeowners must contact the LCHD to get the septic permit before starting any kind of septic system installation. A FREE cost pre-inspection field visit could be done; if required. All county regulations (LaGrange County Ordinance 1985 and ISDH rules)

Use of Existing Septic Systems

Use of existing onsite wastewater disposal systems in conjunction with new home construction and or home replacement will be considered case by case with the following conditions to be verified and confirmed:

1. Proof/record of LCHD permit having been issued, inspected and approved. For any septic systems installed before 1967, the LCHD does not have a record.

2. If record is not available in the LCHD or couldn’t be provided by the owner; the existing septic tank could be used if it has adequate capacity. Metal tank cannot be used. The leach field should be upgraded and soil borings are required to issue a permit. Pumping the tank will provide a gallons septic tank capacity and its conditions.

3. Field inspection could be done for observation of existing system without obvious signs of failure like sewage on the ground or sewage running to the nearby ditch or drain tile. Drywells are not allowed to be used as sewage disposal.

4. Water well separation to any part of the existing system must be as currently required by federal, state or county regulations.

Abandonment or Removal of a Septic Tank

The old septic tank must be pumped of all contents by a licensed wastewater management business. If the tank is not removed; the tank abandoned-in-place must be filled with sand, other granular or soil material and compacted to prevent settling; or removing it from the ground. The ISDH has a protocol to abandonment a septic system.

Perimeter Drain

Any subsurface perimeter drain must surround the absorption field on all sides spaced at least 10 feet from the outside edge of the trenches. Elevation points of the drains at each corner of the field and at the location of a free-flowing outlet are required.

If a Pump is Required

Pressure Distribution/Mound system or Flood-Dosed pump specifications should be filled and presented to get the septic permit. If the information is provide by your material’s provider, it should be faxed to the LCHD before call for final inspection.

Water Well Set Back Distances

LaGrange County does not have water well ordinances. A residential water well permit is not required. However, the well drillers need to follow regulations set up by the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) regarding water well separation and any potential source of well contamination. For a commercial well; the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) should be contacted. The local IDEM inspector working in LaGrange County is Megan Wright (574) 245-4870 or 1-800-753-5519.

Set back distances for any part of the on-site system including the septic tank, a wetland cell or field trenches are:

A. From the house, building or any other structure – 10 feet
B. From any residential water well (yours or neighbor’s) – 50 feet
B-1. From any commercial water well (yours or neighbor’s) – 100 feet
C. Property lines – 5 feet
D. Lake, pond or other enclosed water body – 50 feet
E. River, stream, storm water detention area, creek, ditch or drainage tile – 25 feet
F. If a perimeter drain is required, it must be at least – 10 feet from the edge of the trenches. Free outlet plus elevation points are required; otherwise a septic system could be not approved.

Regulations followed by the LaGrange County Health Department regarding water well separations

Residential Septic Permit Procedures

1. To receive a septic permit, a soil evaluation (soil borings) will need to be completed by a soil scientist. The soil boring report is the information regarding soil characteristic where an onsite sewage disposal system is proposed. This report is only to be used to install the disposal system.

Soil Scientists Working with Soil Borings in LaGrange County

Eickholtz, Inc 
Tom Eickholtz, Kendallville
(260) 318-2858
teickholtz@yahoo.com
Mort-Jones Soil Consulting
Tim Jones, Albion
(800) 764-5696

Schnoebelen’s Soil Construction
Don Schnoebelen, Elkhart
(574) 202-2226
sneb1@comcast.net

Soils1 Soil Science Experts
Mark S. McClain, Fishers
(765) 212-7645
mmcclain1313@gmail.com
Bender Soil Consulting
Justin Bender, Culver
(260) 307-6367
bender.justin@yahoo.com
Soil Scientist and Development Planner, Inc.
Duane Burrow #002
(574) 514-9390
Holymoly_elk@yahoo.com
Soil & Water Investigation
Debra Jimison, Goshen
(574) 612-6622 
Drtjm09@yahoo.com
 

 2. Once the soil report is completed, a copy must be submitted to the LaGrange County Health Department (LCHD). For a commercial system; the soil report should be sent to the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH). The LCHD and ISDH will determine the type and size of the septic system necessary, with respect to the soils information and size of the home, or type of business. Information (Technical Data Sheet) will be mailed to the person in the soil borings report, except different mailing instructions are received.

3. Using the Technical Data Sheet for On-Site Sewage Treatment as a guide, the property owner, or the installer (list of licensed installers) must draw a site plan using the sample enclosed for Gravity Flow System or ask for technical information for Mound sand, Flood-dosed, Pressure dosed and “wetland” (BETS) systems. The site plan must show the house, septic tank size, trenches area with the boring locations marked, the well location, driveway and any other existing buildings. Distances are important and also are required on all site plans. A septic site plan drawing is required to issue a septic permit.

Information to be included in the site plan drawing to get a the septic permit is:

* Set back distances for any part of the on-site system including the septic tank, a wetland cell or field trenches are:

     A. From the house, building or any other structure – 10 feet

     B. From any residential water well (yours or neighbor’s) – 50 feet (100 feet for Commercial under IDEM regulations)

     C. Property lines – 5 feet

     D. Lake, pond or other enclosed water body – 50 feet

     E. River, stream, creek or ditch – 25 feet

* The maximum length of the trenches is 100 feet, and they must be of equal length.

* If the required system is mound sand, flood-dosed or pressure distribution system using a pump, an experienced individual must design the system. A pump technical data sheet is required.

* For commercial septic system; the ISDH should approved the septic site plan submitted by a professional engineer.

4. The Septic Permit Fee is $75.00 (Residential) and $150.00 (Commercial). Only checks and cash are acceptable.

5. After the septic system is installed, a FINAL INSPECTION is required before covering any part of the system. The installer (owner or installer licensed) should call to the Health Department for an appointment.

If you have any questions, please call Alf Garcia at (260) 499-4182, ext. 7.

Commercial Septic Permit Procedures

Commercial Sewage Disposal Plan Review Program (Review Process, February 24, 2017)

Onsite Sewage Disposal Program

Onsite sewage disposal systems (i.e., septic systems) are those which do not result in an off-lot discharge of treated effluent, typically consisting of a septic tank to settle out and digest sewage solids, followed by a system of perforated piping to distribute the treated wastewater for absorption into the soil. More than 800,000 onsite sewage disposal systems are currently used in Indiana Local health departments issue more than 15,000 permits per year for new systems, and about 6,000 permits for repairs.

The Onsite Sewage Disposal Program promotes use of technologically correct onsite sewage disposal methods for one and two family dwellings beyond the reach of sanitary sewers. Program staff reviews soil surveys for on-site disposal systems, plans and specifications for water supply and sewage disposal systems to serve all types of public and commercial facilities. Additionally, the Division reviews total facility construction for various types of facilities, as mandated by law or regulation. These include mobile home parks, organizational campgrounds and recreational campgrounds. Staff review and approve plans and specifications for onsite sewage disposal systems serving any type of commercial facility. Examples of commercial facilities are apartments, subdivisions, mobile home parks, churches, factories, gas stations, groceries, convenience stores, post offices, restaurants, taverns, golf course clubhouses, campgrounds, and veterinary, dental, and medical offices. Program staff provides training and technical assistance about proper onsite sewage disposal to local health departments, consumers and their contractors. The status of soil reports and plans is available at Plan Review Project Status.

Under several rules such as 410 IAC 6-7.1410 IAC 6-7.2 and 410 IAC 6-9 the program is required to approve the construction of Recreational Vehicle, Youth and Agricultural Labor camps. An application is required for all types of camps, however only Recreational Vehicle and Youth camps are required to have plans prepared by be a licensed engineer or architect. Agricultural labor camps plans need to be presented in a manner that will allow the reviewer to determine whether or not the proposed camp meets requirements. If there is a need for an onsite sewage system then the plans for the onsite system need to be prepared by a licensed engineer or architect, accompanied by a completed application and fee. This applies for all types of camps.

If a sanitary sewer is available within a reasonable distance to the proposed facility, installation of an onsite sewage disposal system is prohibited, and a connection must be made to the sewer.

Disposal of petrochemicals and other industrial wastes (in whole or in part) is regulated by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM). Sewage treatment systems that discharge to a stream or other surface water body are also the purview of IDEM.

A summary of the plan review process and requirements is available here (February 2017).

Contact the Program

Indiana State Department of Health
Environmental Public Health Division
2 North Meridian Street, 5-E
Indianapolis, IN 46204
(317) 233-1325 (ISDH Main Switchboard)
1-800-382-9480
Map

Division Director
Mike Mettler
mmettler@isdh.in.gov
(317) 233-7183
(317) 233-7173 [Administrative Assistant] (317) 233-7047 [Fax] Questions: eph@isdh.in.gov

Directories

City and County Health Departments

Indiana Registered Soil Scientists – This list includes a map showing those counties where the soil scientists are willing to serve.

Pre-approved automatic Hot Water Temperature Control Valves – or – PDF [52 KB]
Automatic hot water temperature control valves regulate the hot water temperature at the point of use, to preventing accidental scalding. They are required to be installed in the facilities for which this program reviews plans and specifications.

Pre-approved Exterior Drinking Fountains and Yard Hydrants – or – PDF [17 KB]
Many frost-proof hydrants and exterior drinking fountains allow for possible back-siphonage of contaminated water into a water distribution system. Therefore, approved non-freeze, non-polluting sanitary exterior drinking fountains and yard hydrants are required to be installed in the facilities that this Program regulates.

Pre-approved Exterior Water and Sewer Piping – or – PDF [20 KB]

Pre-approved Manufactured Septic Tanks – or – PDF [109 KB]

Water microbiology laboratories (Indiana-certified) – Public water supply samples are required to be tested by a certified laboratory.

Information Necessary for Review of Technology New to Indiana – PDF [97 KB]


To report a complaint, email eph@isdh.in.gov.

Constructed Wetlands

Bio-Enhanced Treatment System (BETS)

  1. Materials & Installation
    1. Gravity Horizontal (“Conventional”) Flow Constructed Wetland = GHFCW
      1. General Information Plastic Liner
      2. Filter (outlet septic Tank)
      3. Wetland Dimensions
      4. Wetland Plants & Guide to Selecting Plants (#1 & #2)
      5. Operation and Maintenance Manual
      6. General steps for installation
    2. Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland=RVFCW
      1. General steps to Install a RVFCW (LCHD)
      2. RVFCW Treating Residential Wastewater (Purdue-LCHD)
      3. Timer (option 1) Timer (option 2) Plastic Liner
      4. Pump Specifications & Orificies Shield/Diffusers
      5. Wetland Plants & Guide to Selecting Plants (#1 & #2)
      6. Constructed Wetlands: LEED BD+C Certification Program 
  2. Future Reports: Recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands to enhance biological nitrogenous and phosphorus removal from sewage: Engineered ecosystem for sustainable biomass crop production (Research Project in Progress).
    1. Recycled Shredded-Tire Chips Used As Support Material in a Constructed Wetland Treating High-Strength Wastewater from a Bakery: Case Study. Recycling 1 (1): 3-13, 2016.
    2. Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) on top of a constructed wetland as an engineered ecosystem to clean sewage onsite. Open Journal of Water Pollution and Treatment 1 (2): 83-91, September 2014.

    3. Recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands at Gunthorp farms, LaGrange County, Indiana. Innovations in Wastewater Management for Small Meat Processors. A Niche Meat Processor Assistance Network. July 23, 2013 Webinar. Link  Presentation 

    4. Microbial analysis and chemical composition of corn (Zea mays, L.) growing on a recirculating vertical flow constructed wetland treating sewage on-site. Biosystem Engineering 114 (3): 351-356, March 2013.

    5. Evaluation of on-site sewage system nitrogen removal technologies vegetated recirculating gravel filter. Report to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-R10-PS-1005), and Washington State Department of Ecology. The University of Washington – Civil and Environmental Engineering Department and Washington State Department of Health: Office of Shellfish and Water Protection. December 31, 2013.
      Final Report | Summary (This demonstration project replicated the RVFCW used in LaGrange County)

    6. The efficiency of constructed wetlands for the removal of the antimicrobial agent Triclosan from wastewater.Doctoral Dissertation, Lisa Zinn, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. December 2012. (Constructed wetlands installed in LaGrange County were used for this research).

    7. Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland for On-Site Sewage Treatment: An Approach for a Sustainable Ecosystem. Journal of Water and Environment Technology 9(1): 39-46, March 2011.

    8. Wetland Demonstration Project: One Percent for the Tetons, Teton Conservation District, Teton County Engineering Department, and Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (2011, 64 pp. Report) (This demonstration project replicated the RVFCW used in LaGrange County)

    9. Engineered Green Technology to Grow Fuel Corn (Zea Mays L.): Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland Treating Sewage On-Site (American Water Work Association Annual Meeting. The World’s Water Event. Chicago, June 2010).

    10. RVFCW – Animal Shelter (Indiana State Department of Health Annual Training Meeting. Indianapolis, March 2010).

    11. Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland, Green Alternative to Treating Both Human and Animal Sewage (Journal of Environmental Health 72 (4): 17-20, November 2009).

    12. Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland For Treating Residential Wastewater (LaGrange County Health Department & Purdue University, Indiana. RW-4-W: 1-8, January 2008)

    13. Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland for the Animal Shelter(World Aquaculture Society Meeting, Puerto Rico, November 2007). Reprinted by the Indiana Environmental Health Association, 2008. Journal of Environmental Health 23 (1): 5-8.

    14. First Residential Recirculating Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland installed in LaGrange County: Water Quality Report (SmallFlows Magazine 7 (4): 34-38, Fall 2006)

    15. Build Your Own Constructed Wetland. LaGrange County Health Department Experience (SmallFlows Magazine, 5 (4): 26-29, Fall 2004)

    16. First Commercial Constructed Wetland installed in LaGrange County: Fish & Roger Lakes (±50,000 GPD)(LaGrange County Utility District, 1994)

    17. Performance of a Constructed Wetland for dairy waste treatment in LaGrange County, Indiana (Purdue University, 1994)

Constructed Wetlands Resources & Links

Homeowner Septic System Installation

A homeowner is allowed to install the onsite wastewater disposal system for his/her residential. However, homeowners must contact the LCHD to get the septic permit before starting any kind of septic system installation. A free cost pre-inspection field visit can be done if required. All county regulations (LaGrange County Ordinance) and ISDH (Residential Rule 410 IAC 6-8.3) rules apply.

Sanitary Sewer

Fact Sheet: Sewer in Small Communities

One more option: An Affordable Wastewater Collection and Treatment Solution for Municipalities. Thinking out of the wastewater treatment plants only option.

Site Energy Management Plan for Wastewater Plants to Reduce Carbon Footprint

How do I find out if sanitary sewer is available for my property? Sewer Connection Information (pdf)

LAGRANGE CO. LAKES & SANITARY SEWERS UNDER DISTRICT REGULATIONS

TOWN OF LAGRANGE: Call for information 260-463-2042
The areas of the town of LaGrange that are within the designated distance to the public sewer lines to connect to the public sewer.

TOWN OF SHIPSHEWANA: Call for information 260-768-4743
The areas of the town of Shipshewana that are within the designated distance to the public sewer lines to connect to the public sewer.

TOWN OF TOPEKA: Call for information 260-593-2300
The areas of the town of Topeka that are within the designated distance to the public sewer lines to connect to the public sewer.

TOWN OF WOLCOTTVILLE: Call for information 260-854-3316
The areas of the town of Wolcottville that are within the designated distance to the public sewer lines to connect to the public sewer. (Includes Witmer Lake)

LAGRANGE COUNTY REGIONAL UTILITY DISTRICT: Call for information 260-499-6349
Appleman Lake, Atwood Lake, Big Long Lake, Big Turkey Lake, Blackman Lake, Cass Lake, Dallas Lake, Fish Lake, Hackenburg Lake, Lake of the Woods, Little Turkey Lake, Martin Lake, Messick Lake, Olin Lake, Oliver Lake, Pretty Lake, Royer Lake, Shipshewana Lake, Stone Lake, Taylor Lake, Westler Lake

ADAMS LAKE REGIONAL SEWER DISTRICT: Call for information 260-982-2252
Adams Lake

STEUBEN LAKES REGIONAL WASTE DISTRICT: Call for information 260-665-9865
Part of Wall Lake, Part of Green Lake

LAKES THAT ARE STILL ON INDIVIDUAL SEWER:
Brokesha Lake, Cedar Lake, Cotton Lake, Emma Lake, Fennell Lake, Grass Lake, Green Lake, Mud Lake, North Twin, Pigeon River, Rainbow Lake, South Twin, Still Lake

Links

LaGrange County Government
Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH)
Indiana Public Health Association (IPHA)
Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM)
Indiana Environmental Health Association (IEHA)
Indiana Poison Center
Indiana Vector Control Association
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/Topics/default.htm
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Stuart Meade Educational Videos
Algaewheel
http://www.portapotty.net/plumbing/

Sewer Utility Links

LaGrange County Regional Utility District
For sewer connection around Fish & Roger Lakes; Oliver Lake; Pretty Lake; Big Long Lake; Lake of the Woods; Turkey Lakes; Stroh; Elmira; Dallas Lake; Messick Lake; Atwood Lake; Westler Lake; Martin Lake; Shipshewana Lake.

Steuben Lakes Regional Waste District
For sewer connection around Wall Lake.

Town of LaGrange
For sewer connection around Town of LaGrange.

Town of Shipshewana
For sewer connection around Town of Shipshewana, US20, SR5 to 100S.

Town of Topeka
For sewer connection around Town of Topeka.

Town of Wolcottville
For sewer connection around Town of Wolcottville, and Witmer Lake.
Phone: (260) 854-3316
Fax: (260) 854-9215
tofwolcot@locl.net

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How much is for an onsite sewage system disposal permit?
A: The Septic Permit Fee is $ 75.00 (Residential) and $150.00 (Commercial).

Q: What do I need to apply for a septic permit for a new house and how long does it take?
A: Review the Residential On-Site Sewage Treatment Permit Procedures. If you have ready a septic site plan; to issue the septic permit takes less than 10 minutes. Please, feel free to contact the LCHD before to visit our office to be sure somebody will there to help you.

Q: What do I need to apply for a septic permit to repair a failing septic and how long does it take?
A: Review the Residential On-Site Sewage Treatment . If you have copy of the soil borings or it was done before, feel free to call the LCHD. If you have ready a septic site plan; to issue the septic permit takes less than 10 minutes. Please, feel free to contact the LCHD before to visit our office to be sure somebody will be available to help you, and/or issue the septic permit. (Permit Procedures)

Q: What do I need to do in order to use my existing septic for a new home?
A: Use of existing onsite wastewater disposal systems in conjunction with new home construction and or home replacement will be considered case by case. See the minimum conditions for use existing septic system.

Q: What is an on-site or soil borings evaluation?
A: An on-site or soil borings evaluation is an actual physical visit to the lot or location where onsite sewage is proposed and sanitary sewer is not available. A Soil Scientist will provide direct detailed soil analysis to be reviewed by LCHD (residential) or ISDH (commercial) to provide minimum requirements for the proposed system.

Q: What are minimum requirements for septic system?
A: Each jurisdictional government entity (state, county, town, etc) requires certain minimum criteria to be satisfied prior to a septic permit being written or an on-site sewage disposal system being installed. The system type, size and location criteria are provided in a format relative to the number of bedrooms in the home, and according to the soil borings report. The LCHD ordinances require 1000 gallons septic tank and 500 square feet of leach/absorption or disposal field as the minimum septic system size requirements to be installed in LaGrange County.

Q: How do I request an onsite evaluation/soil boring and how long does it take? Is there a cost involved?
A: Onsite evaluations are done by private soil scientist consultants. You need to contact them for the cost to do a soil boring evaluation for septic system. This evaluation cannot be used for buildings. Be aware that the soil borings location is exclusive to install the septic system disposal field (trenches, mound, etc); otherwise new soil borings will be required.

Q: How long is a septic permit good for?
A: The septic permit is good for one year but it could be renewed if the system has not been installed within one (1) year of permit issued. The soil boring location should be protected from heavy traffic or equipment.
Q: What about homeowner septic system installation?
A: A homeowner is allowed to install the onsite wastewater disposal system for his/her residential. However, homeowners must contact the LCHD to get the septic permit before starting any installation. A free pre-inspection field visit could be done; if required. All county regulations (LaGrange County Ordinance) and ISDH (State Residential Rule 410 IAC 6-8.2) rules apply.

Q: How do I call in septic inspections?
A: After the septic system is installed, a FINAL INSPECTION is required before covering any part of the system. The installer (owner or installer licensed) should call to the Health Department (499-4182 ext. 7) for an appointment. An advance call at least 24 hours is highly appreciate. During the summer season, a 48 hours notification is recommended considering the high number of inspections and only one inspector is available. Daily calls will be followed as time permitting and every effort will be done to schedule the inspections as daily workload allows.

Q: Is there a diagram of my existing septic on file at the LCHD?
A: Homes constructed prior to 1970, there are no diagrams available for these homes; please contact a septic installer or excavator to locate your septic system. Record for a septic system installed with a permit issued after 1970 by the LCHD should be requested contacting the LCHD office (499-4182 Ext 1). Any inquires or private request by second or third parties should be faxed to 499-4189, Attn: Alf Garcia, or e-mailed to agarcia@lagrangecounty.org.

Q: How do I find out if sanitary sewer is available for my property?
A: If the property is located around or nearby the Town of LaGrange, the Town of Shipshewana, the Town of Topeka, the Town of Wolcottville (260-854-3316), the Adams Lake Regional Sewer District (260-982-2252), the Steuben Lakes Regional Waste District, or the LaGrange County Regional Utility District; Contact your respective city government. A release note should be obtained before a soil evaluation is requested. A health department permit can not be issued to install a septic system if there is sanitary sewer available up to 500 feet of the property lines.

Q: If there is no record of my septic diagram, how would I find the location of my system?
A: You may contact a septic installer, septic pumping or hauler, or excavator to help you locating your system. For any septic system installed before 1970, a record is not available.

Q: Are residential and commercial water wells installation permits required?
A: Currently, LaGrange County does not have a drinking water well ordinance. However, well driller should be following any Indiana State or Federal law regulating both residential and commercial well installation. For any commercial well, including questioning; IDEM (South Bend office (574) 245-4870) should be contacted to get any permit required by state law.

Q: How can I become a registered installer?
A: A $2,000.00 insurer bond should be posted in the Assessors Office plus there is a yearly $150.00 registration fee (January-December). Testing is not required but educational training and others requirements could be required. Any additional questions about license o registration, please call Kelly Bills (499-4182, ext. 5, or kbills@lagrangecounty.org), or for techical questions, please contact Alf Garcia (499-4182 ext. 7).

Q: If I have a septic permit and would like to change septic installers, what do I do?
A: Contact the LCHD; Environmental Health Division Office (499-4182, ext. 7) and provide the information to ensure that the installer is licensed and registered to work in LaGrange County.

Q: I have received the results from my onsite evaluation/soil boring from the LCHD. What do I do now?
A: Your building and/or septic excavator should be contacted. The Technical Data Sheet provides the information required to design the septic system. A septic site plan is required to issue the septic permit.
Q: How to get a holding tank permit installation?
A temporary sewage holding tank shall not be used as primary means of residential or commercial sewage disposal. The LCHD could issued temporary sewage holding tank if in 1 year or less the building will be connected to the sanitary city sewer.

Q: I want to construct a pole building, a swimming pool, etc. on my property. What are the isolation distances from the septic tank, absorption area and reserve area?
Set back distances for any part of the on-site system including the tank, a constructed wetland cell or field trenches:
A. From the house, building or any other structure – 10 feet
B. From any residential water well (yours or neighbor’s) – 50 feet
C. From any commercial water well – 100 feet
D. Property line – 5 feet
E. Lake, pond or other enclosed water body – 50 feet
F. River, stream, creek or ditch – 25 feet